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Terry’s Chocolate Factory

In 1926, Terry’s Chocolate moved to a purpose-built factory off Bishopthorpe Road York. It was here that some of the most enduring brands were created. All Gold was first produced here in 1930 and the Chocolate Orange in 1931.

In 1939 the Second World War saw a change of use for the factory, F Hills and Sons, a manufacturer and repairer of aircraft propeller blades from Manchester, moved into the factory.

After the war it reverted back to chocolate and in 1975 the company was acquired by United Biscuits. In 1993 Kraft General Foods buys the Terry’s Group from United Biscuits and joins it with Jacobs Suchard to create Terry’s Suchard.

In 2004 Kraft announces the closure of the York site and on September 30, 2005, the factory closes it’s doors for the final time with production moving to mainland Europe.

Sunbeamland

John Marston was born in Ludlow, Shropshire in 1836, at 15 he was sent to Wolverhampton to be apprenticed to Edward Perry as a japanware manufacturer. 8 years later, he left and set up his own company: John Marston ltd.

In 1897 they began making bicycles and Sunbeam was born, consequently the Paul street factory in Wolverhampton was named Sunbeamland.

In 1905 the Sunbeam Motor Car Company Ltd was born, but when a slump affected the car industry in 1912, they where pushed into producing motorcycles and following on from their bicycle production the motorcycles where of a very high quality.

After the First World War, the company was sold to a consortium, in 1927 this consortium was amalgamated to include I.C.I.

In 1937 AMC purchased the Sunbeam motorcycle trademark and moved the production to London. I.C.I who kept ownership of the building, proceeded to manufacture radiators for cars and aircraft at this site.

St Johns Asylum

The Asylum was built in 1852 as “Lindsey and Holland Counties and Lincoln and District Lunatic Asylum” on a slight rise in Bracebridge parish, on the high road to Sleaford.

Originally built to house 250 inmates, it was enlarged in 1859, 1866, 1881 and 1902. The asylum grounds covered 120 acres.

Through its history, the Asylum was known under many different names including “Bracebridge Heath Asylum” and “Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum”.

Staffordshire General Lunatic Asylum

Staffordshire General Lunatic Asylum opened on a 40-acre site to the north east of Stafford town centre on 1.10.1818.

The original building was designed by the County Surveyor, Joseph Potter.

It was enlarged in 1849-1850.

When Coton Hill Asylum opened in 1854 for private paying patients, the Stafford County Asylum only took ‘pauper lunatics’. The hospital was transferred to the National Health Service in 1948 and renamed St George’s Hospital.

The doors finally closed in 1995

St Edwards Boys Home

Father George Vincent Hudson, founded Father Hudson’s Society, from a lowly beginning, this man sowed the seeds of a Great Midland’s Charity, which still flourishes today. He is remembered for his vision and humanity and as a man who gave his life to the care of many thousands of children in desperate need. With the growth of the factory system and the exploitation of child labour, Father Hudson feared for the children who found themselves destitute through no fault of their own, helpless, friendless and powerless. The Birmingham Diocesan Rescue Society was formally set up in 1902. Father Hudsons devotion to the children and his patience and energy guided its development, so the society became colloquially known as Father Hudson’s Homes. Father Hudson remained at Coleshill from 1898 to 1934. A network of ‘agents’ were set-up throughout the diocese to report on any cases that arose for referral to “The Homes” but in 1998 the priest in charge of the school was convicted of 18 cases of child abuse and jailed for seven years. where he was to die after serving just three years of his sentence. May be as a result of this, all the homes had closed as residential homes for children.

Sleaford Bass Maltings

The site was purchased by Bass Ratcliff & Greeton Ltd in 1901, and building commenced to the design of Mr H A Couchman, an architect responsible for previous Bass projects.

Construction spanned six years, starting with the engine house and associated buildings, and finishing with the smaller ancillary buildings such as the manager’s cottages, dining halls, and the administrative offices, the Maltings cost around £350,000 to complete. Its eight massive malt houses, central water tower, and tall chimney dominate the skyline.

The malt production finally ceased in 1959.

In 1973 the Sleaford Bass Maltings were purchased by a local firm, GW Padley (Property) Ltd who utilised it for chicken rearing and vegetable processing, but the chicken rearing came to end during the 1990’s.

Considered to be of special architectural and historical interest, the Sleaford Bass Maltings were to become Grade II listed in 1974.

Sheffield Old Town Hall

The original bulding was built in 1807 by Charles Watson to replace the first town hall that had little scope for extension.

The hall housed the Town Trustees and the Quarter and Petty Sessions, it was a five bay structure opening out onto Castle Street.

In 1833 and 1866 it underwent extensions by William Flockton and included a clock tower that was built over the new main entrance which orientated the entrance onto Waingate, at this time, the courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the police station.

The building underwent a further extension in 1896-97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 the building has been left unused.

In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk.

Rutland Cutlery

Rutland cutlery, who was part of the Osbourne Tableware Group, was a blade grinding and polishing company located in Sheffield south Yorkshire.

It was due to celebrate 300 years of trading in late 2009 but was unexpectedly put into receivership in January 2009.

Six months earlier it was acquired by two local businessmen who had ambitious plans to put the company (better known as Nickel Blanks) back on its feet bringing all of its five subsidiaries together under one roof at Meadowhall Sheffield.

The site you see here was the Rutland Cutlery side of the group.

Rockwood Pigments

The point of note for this site is that the entrance to ‘Side Mine’ is located within the grounds. The Side Mine was opened as a show cavern between 1825-1845. The mining finished when the owner gave up his attempt to drain the workings of water.

The site that the colour works sits on, is composed of mine waste from the Side Mine, the owner erected a water wheel of 80hp, capable of raising 1000 gals per hour, this was then used to grind barytes for the paint industry, just as the industry was demanding a cheap alternative to white lead.